Synopsis

The All Our Families (formerly All Our Babies) cohort is a longitudinal pregnancy cohort that enables the investigation of the relationships between parental well-being and outcomes for children and families. This cohort also provides us with contemporary information about children growing up in an urban setting. All Our Families participants have provided information about mental health, lifestyle, neighborhood, pregnancy, parenting, child development, family life, recreation, screen time, sleep and use of services. This information will help us identify how what happens early can influence later health and development outcomes for children and families.

Summary

Study name  All Our Families Study (formerly All Our Babies Study)
Study abbreviation  AOF
Current principal investigator/s  Suzanne Tough
(Co-PIs): Karen Benzies, Beverly Collisson, Sheila McDonald, Donna Slater, Deborah McNeil
Current project manager Nikki Stephenson
Cohort representative (study contact) Nikki Stephenson
Postal address Owerko Centre | c/o 2500 University Dr. NW | Calgary, AB | T2N 1N4
Phone +1 403-441-8455
Email allourfamilies@ucalgary.ca
Primary Institution University of Calgary
Major funding sources  Alberta Innovates (200700595), Alberta Health, Alberta Health Services, Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation, Max Bell Foundation
Study website allourfamiliesstudy.com
Key reference

 (1) McDonald SW, Lyon AW, Benzies KM, McNeil DA, Lye SJ, Dolan SJ, Pennell CE, Bocking AD, Tough SC. The All Our Babies pregnancy cohort: design, methods, and participant characteristics. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. January 2013, 13(Suppl 1):S2. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-13-S1-S2.

(2) Tough SC, McDonald SW, Collisson BA, Graham SA, Kehler H, Kingston D, Benzies K. Cohort profile: the All Our Babies cohort (AOB). International Journal of Epidemiology. October 2017. 46(5): 1389-1390k. DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyw363.

Are data available outside study team?  Yes 
Study focus  The All Our Families (AOF) study is a prospective community-based pregnancy cohort that follows maternal-infant pairs across the early life course to describe the relationships between health services, social and demographic environment, and maternal characteristics and birth outcomes & child development in an urban setting. This study has information about women’s prenatal care experiences in an urban environment and barriers and facilitators to accessing care. AOB/F data covers subject areas including: a) Maternal Prenatal Health (e.g., prenatal care, maternal gestation); b) Pregnancy History (e.g., previous pregnancies, previous preterm birth); c) Pre-pregnancy (e.g., pregnancy planning advice received, contraception use, pregnancy intention); d) Health Care Services (e.g., utilization of services for mother and baby); e) Food, Exercise and Housing (e.g., nutrition, housing, neighbourhood safety and cohesion); f) Lifestyle (e.g., T-ACE Screen for alcohol consumption risk, smoking, drugs); g) Social Support (Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale, partner/relationship satisfaction); h) Mental Health (e.g., Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Spielberger State Anxiety Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, optimism [Life Orientation Test-Revised]); i) Life Events (e.g., previous mental health, abuse); j) Sociodemographic Outcomes (e.g., age, marital status, education, ethnicity, work status); k) Birth Outcomes – maternal and delivery (e.g. site of birth, delivery type, medication, delivery support); l) Birth Outcomes -infant (e.g., sex, birth weight, gestational age); m)Baby Health/Development (e.g., doctor, check-up, vaccinations); n) Parenting/ PostpartumExperiences (e.g. Parenting Morale Index, breastfeeding [Montreal Children’s Hospital Feeding Scale],community service utilization)
Sampling frame Maternal/infant child dyad
Year commenced 2008
Commencement sample 3388
Intergenerational?  Yes
Imaging N/A 
Linkage N/A 
Biosamples? Blood, cord blood, plasma, and serum 
Ethics approvals or requirements?  This study was approved by the Child Health Research Office and the Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board of the Faculties of Medicine, Nursing, and Kinesiology, University of Calgary, and the Affiliated Teaching Institutions (Ethics ID 20821 and 22821). Participants provided consent at the time of recruitment and were provided copies of the consent form for their records. Recruitment from health care offices (posters, word-of-mouth) and the regional health services website, and recruitment over the phone (women receiving prenatal viral serology tests were contacted by Calgary Laboratory Services to request permission to release patient contact information to the AOF research staff, who if consenting were contacted to determine eligibility).

Waves

Wave Year Age (mean, range) Eligible sample
1 Q1 This questionnaire referred to the first maternal questionnaire given at <25 weeks gestation. May 2008 – May 2011 30.6 years (18-47) Less than 24 weeks and 6 days gestation age at time of recruitment, at least 18 years of age, receiving prenatal care in Calgary, and able to complete the questionnaires in English (n=3362, 99% response rate).
2 Q2 This questionnaire referred to the second maternal questionnaire given at 34-36 weeks gestation. July 2008 – September 2011 31.0 years (18-47) Pregnant at 34-36 weeks gestation, completed previous AOF questionnaire, not discontinued (n=3181, 94% response rate).
3 Q3 This questionnaire referred to the third maternal questionnaire given at 4 months post-delivery. December 2008 – February 2012 31.2 years (18-47) 4 months post-delivery, completed previous AOF questionnaires, not discontinued (n= 3057, 90% response rate).
4 Q4 This questionnaire referred to the fourth maternal questionnaire given at 12 months postpartum post-delivery. June 2011 – October 2012 32.4 years (19-45) 12 months follow up, completed previous AOF questionnaires, not discontinued. At 12 months the number eligible for follow up decreased due to a number of factors including timing of questionnaire design and implementation, ethics approval, funding constraints, and cohort attrition (n=1573, response rate among eligible 81%). Some factors had greater impact than others depending on the data collection wave.
5 Q5 This questionnaire referred to the fifth maternal questionnaire given at 24 months post-delivery. October 2011 – October 2013 33.4 years (20-45) 24 months follow up, completed previous AOF questionnaires, not discontinued. At this time point sample size was influenced by timing of questionnaire design and implementation, ethics approval, and cohort attrition(n= 1595, response rate among eligible 76%). Some factors had greater impact than others depending on the data collection wave.
6 Q6 This questionnaire referred to the sixth maternal questionnaire given at 36 months post-delivery. April 2012 – October 2014 34.4 years (21-48) 36 months follow up, completed previous AOF questionnaires, not discontinued. At this time point the majority of original participants were eligible, although there was some cohort attrition (n= 1994, response rate among eligible 69%).
7 Q7 This questionnaire referred to the seventh maternal questionnaire given at 5 years post-delivery. April 2014 – October 2016 36.5 years (24-50) 5 years follow up, completed previous AOF questionnaires, not discontinued.
8 Q8 This questionnaire referred to the seventh maternal questionnaire given at 8 years post-delivery. April 2014 – PRESENT Not available, data collection ongoing. 8 years follow up, completed previous AOF questionnaires, not discontinued.